Educational Articles

Dogs

  • Acupuncture is one aspect of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) that focuses on restoring the energy balance in the body to promote healing. The technique requires the insertion of fine needles into the dog’s body at specified points, called acupuncture points, where nerves and blood vessels converge. It is often used to treat dogs with arthritis and joint inflammation and may reduce the amount of medication a dog needs for these conditions. This handout explains how the treatment works and what to expect when your pet sees a veterinary acupuncturist.

  • Acute caudal myopathy results from overuse of the tail, causing a strain or sprain of the muscle groups used for tail wagging. Possible scenarios leading to limber tail include hard/vigorous play within the previous 24 hours, prolonged swimming, or active hunting within the past few days. The tail may droop limply between your dog's rear legs, or it may stick straight out behind him for a short distance before drooping. Uncomplicated acute caudal myopathy is treated with rest and anti-inflammatory medication.

  • Acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis (AHDS) (also known as hemorrhagic gastroenteritis [HGE]), is an acute disorder of dogs characterized by vomiting and bloody diarrhea. AHDS can affect any breed, age, size, or gender of dog, but it is most common in small- and toy-breed dogs. The exact cause of AHDS remains unknown. An elevated hematocrit in combination with a low or normal total protein is an important clue that a dog may have AHDS. Intravenous fluid therapy with potassium and electrolyte supplementation provides the foundation of AHDS therapy. Dogs with AHDS may die, if left untreated.

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, also known as shock lung, is a life-threatening complication of critical illness in dogs, such as systemic infection or disease, severe trauma, or near-drowning. Treatment involves targeting the underlying cause while also supporting the dog's compromised lung function with the use of an oxygen cage, an oxygen line direct to the dog's nasal passages, or in severe cases, a mechanical ventilator. Unfortunately, the prognosis for this condition is poor.

  • Addison’s disease is caused by the decreased release of the hormones cortisol and aldosterone from the adrenal cortex. Most commonly caused by immune-mediated destruction, Addison’s disease can also be caused by trauma, infection, neoplasia or hyperadrenocorticism treatment. Clinical signs are non-specific and often come and go. Common signs include lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, increased thirst and urination, and weight loss. Some patients present in an Addisonian crisis which includes severe weakness, severe vomiting and diarrhea and requires immediate medical intensive care in hospital. Addison’s is diagnosed using history, bloodwork, urinalysis, and ultimately an ACTH stimulation test. Addison’s is treated by administering synthetic replacements for aldosterone and cortisol. Prognosis is good once dogs have been stabilized on medication.

  • Lipomas are common, usually harmless, tumors of fat that usually show up as a lump under the skin in middle-aged to older animals. Some pets will develop these tumors in their armpit region, between their legs, or around the neck, which can cause discomfort and/or lameness. You may see your pet exhibit an irregular gait, and/or reluctance to stand, walk upstairs, or go for their normal walks. This handout reviews the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of lipomas.

  • An adrenal cortex tumor is an abnormal growth of cells in the adrenal cortex. These tumors result in overproduction of cortisol and can be malignant (cancerous) or benign. In both cases, an adrenal cortex tumor can cause Cushing's disease in dogs. Malignant tumors can metastasize to other organs, including the kidneys, lymph nodes, and thyroid gland. The sooner a diagnosis and treatment plan can be determined, the better the outcome for your pet.

  • The adrenal medulla is responsible for producing hormones such as epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine. An adrenal medulla tumor is the result of abnormal, uncontrolled growth of the cells that produce these hormones. These tumors may go undetected for a long time and clinical signs may be subtle. These signs could include weakness, excessive panting and restlessness, newly noted anxiety, and an increase in drinking and urination. The biggest concern with these tumors is their ability to continue to grow and invade local tissues, which can make surgical removal difficult or impossible.

  • Afoxolaner is a chewable tablet used to treat and prevent flea and tick infestations in dogs. It has also been used off-label to treat certain types of mange and mites. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset or neurologic symptoms. Do not use in pets with a history of seizures. If a negative reaction occurs, please call the veterinary office.

  • Aggression may be defined as any threat or harmful behavior directed toward another individual or group. Aggression in dogs commonly includes body language or threat displays such as a hard stare, growling, barking, snarling, lunging, snapping, and/or biting. There are many different categories or types of canine aggression including territorial, possessive, maternal/protective, pain-related, predatory, frustration, social conflict-related, sexual, disease-related, and fear- or anxiety-related aggression. The most common presentation of aggression is fear or anxiety motivated. The treatment of aggression will depend on the cause of aggression. Aggression should first be discussed with your veterinarian regarding the most appropriate treatment.

Contact Us

Upper Middle Road Animal Hospital
1450 Headon Rd - Unit 3
Burlington, ON L7M 3Z5

Phone:
905-635-2428


Email:
[email protected]


Doctor is on call for after hours appointments.


Location Hours
Monday12:00pm – 5:00pm
Tuesday12:00pm – 5:00pm
Wednesday12:00pm – 5:00pm
Thursday12:00pm – 5:00pm
Friday12:00pm – 5:00pm
Saturday10:00am – 2:00pm
SundayClosed